Archive for September, 2013

Before we get started on the workout, let’s take a moment to explain the “Chest, Back, Legs, Shoulders & Arms” split. When training for maximum muscular gains, you want to hit each muscle group with intense training 1-2 times per week. When choosing a workout split that works for you it is important to first determine the number of days you are available to train on a regular basis. Once you know the number of days, then picking the body parts to work with each workout becomes much easier. There is no “right split.” There are instead numerous possibilities you can chose from to reach your goals. This four day body part split is awesome for hitting every major muscle group once per week. It allows a person with 3-4 hours a week available to work out to make unbelievable gains. Believe it! In Four 40-55 minute workouts, as listed here, you can create a rock hard physique.

The following is a program designed to blast your total body into shape. This is a comprehensive regiment designed to build lean mass and symmetry throughout your entire physique. The number of exercises, sets and repetitions is adjusted depending upon your current fitness level. If you are a “beginner,” follow the “beginner” program. The same goes for “intermediate” and “advanced.” Once you have mastered a particular level and are competent and confident in your progression then, and only then, move on to the next level. It should go without saying, but it is advised to seek clearance from a medical professional before beginning any exercise program. This is no different. As always, if any exercise feels dangerous or hurts in a way other than the good muscular burn, use an alternative exercise. This is a challenging program and all warnings and necessary precautions should be taken. Now that that has been said and all of the legal bases are covered…it’s time to get after it!

Monday (Chest)

Beginners: Perform the first THREE exercises for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions. Follow that with 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions for each abdominal exercise.

Intermediates: Perform the first FOUR exercises for 4 sets of 15,12,10,8 repetitions. Follow that with 4 sets of 10-20 repetitions for each abdominal exercise.

Advanced: Perform the first FOUR of the listed exercises for 5 sets ranging from 5-20 repetitions. Then perform the final exercise (Push-Ups) for TWO sets to complete temporary muscle fatigue. Follow that with 4 sets of 15-30 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

1. Bench Press

2. Incline Bench Press

3. Pec Flies (Attachment)

4. Decline Bench Press

5. Push-Ups

6. Abdominals

* Machine Crunches

* Seated Plate Twists

* Leg Raises

Tuesday (Back)

Beginners: Perform the first THREE exercises for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions. Follow that with 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

Intermediates: Perform the first FOUR exercises for 4 sets of 15,12,10,8 repetitions. Follow that with 4 sets of 10-20 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

Advanced: Perform ALL of the listed exercises for 5 sets ranging from 5-20 repetitions. Follow that with 4 sets of 15-30 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

1. Bent-Over Row

2. Lat Pulldown (Overhand wide)

3. Machine Row (Preacher Curl/Row Attachment)

4. Lat Pulldown (Underhand close using small bar attached to pull-down assembly)

5. Prone Incline Bench Rows

6. Abdominals

* Sit-Ups

* Supermans

* Bicycle

Thursday (Legs)

Beginners: Perform the first FOUR exercises for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions. Perform 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises. (A repetition for the twisting plank is when each hip has touched the ground.)

Intermediates: Perform the first FIVE exercises for 4 sets of 15,12,10,8 repetitions. Perform 4 sets of 10-20 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises. (A repetition for the twisting plank is when each hip has touched the ground.)

Advanced: Perform ALL of the listed exercises for 4 sets ranging from 5-20 repetitions per set. Perform 4 sets of 15-30 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises. (A repetition for the twisting plank is when each hip has touched the ground.)

1. Machine Squat

2. Leg Extension

3. Leg Curl

4. Double Leg Calf Raise

5. Lunges (Machine Squat Apparatus)

6. Stiff Leg Deadlift

7. Single Leg Calf Raise on Machine Squat

8. Abdominals

* Kick-outs Seated on the bench

* Twisting Plank

* Machine Crunch

Friday (Shoulders & Arms)

Beginners: Perform the first FIVE exercises for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions. Follow that with 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions of each of the abdominal exercises.

Intermediates: Perform the first SEVEN exercises for 3 sets 15,12,10 repetitions. Follow that with 4 sets of 10-20 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

Advanced: Perform ALL of the listed exercises for 3-4 sets ranging from 5-20 repetitions. Follow that with 3 sets of 15-30 repetitions for each of the abdominal exercises.

1. Shoulder Press

2. Barbell Style Upright Row

3. Plate Side Raises (hold a single plate in each hand)

4. Preacher Curl (Attachment)

5. Triceps Pushdown (On Lat assembly with small bar attached)

6. Standing Barbell Style Curl

7. Dip Machine Press-down (Attachment)

8. Shrugs

9. Pec Attachment Bent over Rear Delt Pull

10. Abdominals

* V-Ups or Toe touches

* The Dog

* Leg Raises

* Plank (hold for time rather than reps)

It is recommended that you use a training journal to track your weight and reps each workout. This is a way to be sure you are progressing. You will find that if you are pushing yourself as hard as you should you won’t always get all of the reps. When that happens, use a slightly lower or the same weight the next time you do the workout. When you do get all of the prescribed repetitions, bump up the weight a bit on your next workout. (For upper body exercises try 5-10 pound increases and for lower body try 10-20 pound increases) Practice multiple clean and small meals daily and do these work-outs on a regular basis. You will get results! Remember to start at the proper level and progress to the next when the time is right.

Ian Lauer is a certified strength and conditioning specialist. His background in personal training made him an expert in providing countless of valuable advice and a proud member of Team Powertec. Powertec is the pioneer and leader in the area of strength equipment. Headquartered in Los Angeles, CA, Powertec produces a full line of strength equipment for home and light commercial purposes. Our brand is highly sought after by the educated buyer looking for weight capacity maximization without sacrificing safety, customization of their Workbench home gyms through extensive accessory modularization, and commercial gym quality at home gym prices. Visit our website at http://www.powertecfitness.com or our online magazine at http://www.mag.powertecfitness.com for more fitness advice.

A Guide to College Football Strength Training Programs

Football players need to be able to hang on the gridiron, take the hits, and make the plays. But what should future player hopefuls look for? Train for? Here is a look at some college football strength training programs and when you should start.

Are You Ready For Some Football?

It’s one of America’s favorite pastimes, allowing for friends and families to get together to watch a big game. There are many levels of football, starting from the very pee wee leagues going all the way up to the pros of the Packers, the Jets, the Saints, and the 49ers. For those future football players, dreams of holding up the Vince Lombardi cup and wearing a Super Bowl ring usually starts in youth, when playing in the road or the fields of parks and playgrounds is just a preview to what they hope to achieve.

But when should a player start to consider football as more than just a weekend sport to that of a school activity or even a career? What does a player need to know about strength training? When should they start? Here, we’ll take a look at some college football strength training programs that can help players get the training they need.

College Football Strength Training Programs

Strength training in general is using exercise in order to increase muscle mass, gain speed and agility, and endurance. Strength training is an essential part for any sport or any athlete, as this helps them with speed, muscle memory, and endurance in long games, especially when they go into overtime. Strength training can involve many different types of exercise –

Weight Lifting – weight lifting involves the use of dumbbells, barbells, and even weight machines. This means using them to lift the amount of weight for whatever body part you’re working on. Depending on the exercise, you can easily work your deltoids, shoulders, biceps, triceps, quads, calfs, and other areas. Body Weight – body weight means using the resistance of your body’s weight to lift. This includes doing push ups, pull ups, dips, squats, and crunches. Machines – as mentioned with weight lifting, these are machines designed to allow the user to choose their different weight setting and then moving progressively. This is much like weight lifting, only you are using a machine along with the weight.

For most sports that are offered by a school, they will normally have their own strength training programs. In most cases, these schools will usually have their own school gyms, with training equipment that students can work on either before their practice or during off times when no one will be there. It’s usually the coach of the team that will dictate what kind of training schedule the team will go through or at when a good time is for them to work out.

When to Start and What to Work On

Aspiring football players are usually going to start a strength program when they start playing football. In most cases, in order to play college football, most players have already been playing since either high school or younger and they are conditioned for the rigors of playing college football. Players who start out at a young age will likely play in the pee wee leagues, which are designated for those who are six until either the end of elementary or the start of junior high.

Depending on the junior high school, there may or may not be a football team, however there may still be programs outside of the school that they can participate in. High schools will most likely either continue for a player or will start for many interested in playing. Junior varsity are usually for sophomores and juniors, but sometimes remarkable freshmen are able to join; from junior varsity, players who continue playing are eligible to play varsity, which is usually the main high school team.

Players should concentrate on all parts, though the leg muscles, arms, and chest are important. Depending on the position that the player is taking, a coach may design a workout for each position; for instance, the quarterback should focus on arm strength so that that he’s able to deliver a passing throw; defensive linemen should work gaining upper body strength, so that they can stop the quarterback or the runner.

Training Programs

Training programs for students will often be given by the coach of the team or that of the school. These programs can usually be given during practice, such as part of a warm up before actual practice.

If a player wants to work outside of school, there are a couple of college football strength training programs that they can look into.

Velocity Sports Training – depending on the state and city, a player can try to join Velocity Sports Performance, which is a sports training facility that began with a NCAA coach who wanted to help players with sports training. Sports Fitness Advisor – a website that offers many different programs for strength training for a variety of different sports.

Players should also ask their coach what their recommendations are for programs, in the case their school does not have a program or in addition to using a school program.

http://www.brighthub.com/education/college/articles/112641.aspx

How to build shoulder muscle

The shoulder is one of, if not the most complex muscle group in the human body. Bodybuilders and athletes are usually the types of people in a gym looking build shoulder muscle, not only because it looks great; but also because it helps prevent injury and is a useful muscle in competition. Before hitting the types of exercises one should be doing to build shoulder muscle, it is important to find out exactly which muscles surround this all important socket. On the outer part of the shoulder there is a deltoid that is fairly small, but is attached by many joints into the socket; so it is important to focus on exercises that will build not only the outer part, but the rear and front parts as well. This will keep the shoulder strong and decrease the likelihood of injury. Behind the neck and on top of the shoulder blade is another shoulder muscle known as the trapezius, or in short the trap. This muscle is important for stability in the neck and head as well as preventing back injuries. By working these two muscles, any bodybuilder should be able to increase strength and size in the shoulders.

Another important aspect of building shoulder muscle is how certain exercises are being performed. Since this muscle has so many different components to it (i.e. muscles, tendons, joints, ligaments); it is crucial to make sure that one is lifting with perfect form. Say someone was to try a standing dumbbell shoulder press. In order to do this, they would have to choose a weight that they can lift with some difficulty. They would then snatch the weight to touch their deltoids and then press it over their heads to complete the motion. However, if they do not lift from a point of stability and strength (the front half of your body, rather than the back), they will most likely lose control and injure themselves by dislocating their shoulder or at the very least, by giving it a mild sprain. If a bodybuilder is unsure of how to perform an exercise, they must ask someone who knows what they are doing; and it is always a good idea to get a spotter in case the worst happens.

The final aspect of building shoulder muscle is to look at exactly which types of exercises will hit both the deltoids and the traps. Since these are very different muscles, it is usually difficult to find one exercise that will hit both in one movement. While there are a few out there; it is not like the bench press that will hit both pectorals and triceps in one motion. To build the deltoids, it is generally agreed upon that it must be worked from different angles to build all three parts of this muscle (the rear, the front, and the side). To build the delts, it is a good idea to use movements such as: the shoulder press, the push press (same as shoulder press, but with a bar), reverse lateral raises (also known as flies), front raises, and lateral raises. To build the traps, some exercises that will work are: the shrug, the hang clean, the high pull, and the snatch. Some of the techniques from either muscle can be grouped together however, to create one even motion. These are known as the clean and press (a.k.a. the Olympic lift) and the barbell snatch. Although these sound like a good idea to maximize time in the gym, one should not perform these movements until they are experienced enough to handle them as they can easily result in injury.

There you have it, the best way to build shoulder muscle. As anyone can see, it is not only about the exercises that are being performed; but is which muscles are being worked on and if they are being hit correctly. With these tips, anyone should be able to gain muscle in their shoulders after some hard work and determination.

http://www.helium.com/items/1593082-how-to-build-shoulder-muscles

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